SAME KIND OF DIFFERENT AS ME EPUB

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Read the critically acclaimed New York Times best-seller with more than one million copies in print. Same Kind of Different as Me is releasing as a major motion. [EPUB] Same Kind Of Different As Me: a modern-day slave, an international art dealer, and the unlikely woman who bound them together [PDF. Originally Answered: Suggest me some of the websites which Simply type this in google: " filetype:pdf" . The eBooks can be downloaded in different formats like, EPub, Mobi and PDF.


Same Kind Of Different As Me Epub

Author:ANNITA STAKELIN
Language:English, Japanese, French
Country:Mozambique
Genre:Environment
Pages:351
Published (Last):01.02.2016
ISBN:642-5-78172-459-6
ePub File Size:21.77 MB
PDF File Size:16.44 MB
Distribution:Free* [*Registration Required]
Downloads:28521
Uploaded by: DONA

And then drag the dotepub logo to your browser's bookmarks toolbar. . of the kind vaguely called emancipated, and professed some protest against . No, take your books of mere poetry and prose; let me read a time table, with tears of pride. And that “#navigation” bit at the end means to scroll some element They're also typically too crude to be useful for these kinds of tasks, Like regular fragment identifiers, EPUB CFIs follow a hash character, they're supposed to, but we've started overlapping different levels. . This helped me A LOT!!!. Even in the knowledge that current mainstream EPUB readers and and a URL in a way so similar to xmlns that is makes you wonder why they didn't just use xmlns. “identifier-type” – a way to distinguish between different identifiers, . I am particularly interested in supporting the sharing, discovery and.

And, if you have a blog, we provide a WordPress plugin that automatically embeds our widget. For more customizable results, developers can use our API read the documentation. Download webpages to any epub-compatible device: And, because it is software in the cloud , you benefit from the improvements of future releases without having to re-install anything.

Install the bookmarklet in your browser and build an e-book from the sample text below, just clicking on the installed bookmarklet. Or, if you are not ready to install, try Converter. The suburb of Saffron Park lay on the sunset side of London, as red and ragged as a cloud of sunset. It was built of a bright brick throughout; its sky-line was fantastic, and even its ground plan was wild. It had been the outburst of a speculative builder, faintly tinged with art, who called its architecture sometimes Elizabethan and sometimes Queen Anne, apparently under the impression that the two sovereigns were identical.

It was described with some justice as an artistic colony, though it never in any definable way produced any art. But although its pretensions to be an intellectual centre were a little vague, its pretensions to be a pleasant place were quite indisputable. The stranger who looked for the first time at the quaint red houses could only think how very oddly shaped the people must be who could fit in to them.

Nor when he met the people was he disappointed in this respect. The place was not only pleasant, but perfect, if once he could regard it not as a deception but rather as a dream. That young man with the long, auburn hair and the impudent face—that young man was not really a poet; but surely he was a poem.

That old gentleman with the wild, white beard and the wild, white hat—that venerable humbug was not really a philosopher; but at least he was the cause of philosophy in others.

That scientific gentleman with the bald, egg-like head and the bare, bird-like neck had no real right to the airs of science that he assumed. He had not discovered anything new in biology; but what biological creature could he have discovered more singular than himself? Thus, and thus only, the whole place had properly to be regarded; it had to be considered not so much as a workshop for artists, but as a frail but finished work of art.

EPUB’s used for more things than you realize

A man who stepped into its social atmosphere felt as if he had stepped into a written comedy. More especially this attractive unreality fell upon it about nightfall, when the extravagant roofs were dark against the afterglow and the whole insane village seemed as separate as a drifting cloud.

This again was more strongly true of the many nights of local festivity, when the little gardens were often illuminated, and the big Chinese lanterns glowed in the dwarfish trees like some fierce and monstrous fruit. And this was strongest of all on one particular evening, still vaguely remembered in the locality, of which the auburn-haired poet was the hero.

It was not by any means the only evening of which he was the hero. On many nights those passing by his little back garden might hear his high, didactic voice laying down the law to men and particularly to women.

The attitude of women in such cases was indeed one of the paradoxes of the place. Most of the women were of the kind vaguely called emancipated, and professed some protest against male supremacy. Yet these new women would always pay to a man the extravagant compliment which no ordinary woman ever pays to him, that of listening while he is talking. And Mr.

Lucian Gregory, the red-haired poet, was really in some sense a man worth listening to, even if one only laughed at the end of it. He put the old cant of the lawlessness of art and the art of lawlessness with a certain impudent freshness which gave at least a momentary pleasure.

He was helped in some degree by the arresting oddity of his appearance, which he worked, as the phrase goes, for all it was worth. From within this almost saintly oval, however, his face projected suddenly broad and brutal, the chin carried forward with a look of cockney contempt. This combination at once tickled and terrified the nerves of a neurotic population. He seemed like a walking blasphemy, a blend of the angel and the ape.

This particular evening, if it is remembered for nothing else, will be remembered in that place for its strange sunset. It looked like the end of the world. All the heaven seemed covered with a quite vivid and palpable plumage; you could only say that the sky was full of feathers, and of feathers that almost brushed the face.

Across the great part of the dome they were grey, with the strangest tints of violet and mauve and an unnatural pink or pale green; but towards the west the whole grew past description, transparent and passionate, and the last red-hot plumes of it covered up the sun like something too good to be seen.

The whole was so close about the earth, as to express nothing but a violent secrecy. The very empyrean seemed to be a secret. It expressed that splendid smallness which is the soul of local patriotism. The very sky seemed small. I say that there are some inhabitants who may remember the evening if only by that oppressive sky. There are others who may remember it because it marked the first appearance in the place of the second poet of Saffron Park.

For a long time the red-haired revolutionary had reigned without a rival; it was upon the night of the sunset that his solitude suddenly ended.

The new poet, who introduced himself by the name of Gabriel Syme was a very mild-looking mortal, with a fair, pointed beard and faint, yellow hair. But an impression grew that he was less meek than he looked.

He signalised his entrance by differing with the established poet, Gregory, upon the whole nature of poetry.

He said that he Syme was poet of law, a poet of order; nay, he said he was a poet of respectability. So all the Saffron Parkers looked at him as if he had that moment fallen out of that impossible sky.

EPUB is the standard format for e-manga in Japan. But those are still trade books. What about other kinds of books? Because modern platforms need to be based on Web technologies, and the most widely used specification for how to manage publication content based on the Open Web Platform is EPUB.

More on that in another blog. And they have created an easy-to-use authoring platform, VitalSource Content Studio, that enables not only publishers, but even classroom teachers to create rich, multimedia, interactive EPUBs, without knowing any code. Readers with print disabilities access ebooks on computers or mobile devices using various assistive technologies, including screen readers, refreshable Braille displays, or screen magnification software.

They utilize a variety of gestures in mobile devices, or keyboard shortcuts on computers in order to execute functions. Digital content is inherently more flexible than hard copy. It should be possible to use assistive technologies to read the text out loud with or without being able to see the screen. The user should be able to navigate easily and orientate themselves within the context of the content.

It should be possible for users to change colours or magnify text and have it reflow to fit the page. Of course, readers who cannot access print materials in a conventional way have different accessibility requirements: blind readers need to be able to navigate books like their fully sighted counterparts can, including moving between pages and chapter or section headings, and navigating to a particular section of interest from the table of contents; people with low vision or reading disabilities need to be able to adjust the presentation of content on a screen by, for example, enlarging the font size or changing font and background colours; and people with mobility impairments may need to be able to read and navigate digital books using voice commands or other assistive technology.

This, however, does not always happen. Depending on the aggregator, the publisher, and the format, readers with print disabilities can have very different experiences when trying to access a book. Many publishers and their suppliers are still clinging to EPUB 2, an inherently inferior product from an accessibility point of view. Needs also are changing with the development of new technologies and the familiarity of younger people in particular in working with them.

And they are busy. In , NNELS acquired 23, books — and spent hours remediating of those with their limited in-house staff. These are staggering numbers for a market the size of Canada. NNELS is both a digital public library of downloadable books and an advocate for an accessible and equitable reading ecosystem for Canadians with print disabilities. NNELS supports principles of openness, inclusion, and choice. NNELS develops and maintains a digital repository of accessible titles for Canadians with print disabilities, available through Canadian public libraries, works to advance the agenda of accessible publishing, and builds capacity by providing employment opportunities for people with print disabilities.

Anyone with a print disability can request any title through one of those organizations, thanks to the copyright exemptions that come from Bill C, also known as the Copyright Act. They will download the ebook or print book and then do the incredibly laborious work of re-formatting it for its next reader —stripping junk HTML, OCR scanning, adding alt text, etc. There are a lot of slap dash ebooks in the marketplace that are going to keep the remediation work going for some time.

So what is this mythical print-disabled marketplace? Not so mythical at all. There are 37 million people in Canada; approximately 1. That number does not account for an ageing population.

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That figure ramps up to one in four by the age of As twenty-five percent of the population will be aged 65 or over by , that is a substantial chunk of readers.

So that covers vision issues, but the term print disability is broad. A chunk of the population has a physical issue that prevents them from holding and manipulating a book. Listening to an audiobook while driving, or having voice aids read text aloud so the reader can be hands-free are good examples of that. A breastfeeding mother needs her hands for other things, for example.

Someone who has a broken arm may have trouble navigating an ereader or website. There is a healthy market in readers with print disabilities. And there are some preliminary statistics that point to that group of readers being more voracious than the average. The Italian accessibility organization, Fondazione LIA , points out that where texts are accessible to them, readers with print disabilities consume more than three times the number of books than the non-print-disabled population.

Font sizing, night mode, text orientation, reading mode, colour modifications, and screen magnification. The value of the global population of people with disabilities and their friends and family is 3. This is a very large, untapped market.

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In the UK, this enormous spending power has a nickname: the purple pound. Go out there and court those readers! The consumer market is there and eager to be served.

Opening Up Government Funding Opportunities You may have heard about the latest round of funding in the federal budget. In March of this year, the Liberal government announced This funding is likely going to be geared towards setting publishers up to do better when it comes to ebooks.

They have two streams of funding through the Canada Book Fund : support for organizations, and support for publishers.

There are other ways to tap into government support of accessible publishing as well.I just remember real well how much it used to mean. Because a book has to teach a reader how to read it.

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If you're looking for free EPUB book downloads, know that there are lots of online resources where you can find free books , such as Open Library. Features Download webpages to any epub-compatible device: e-readers, tablets, smartphones, netbooks, desktop computers Yes [h 14]. I think I work harder now. This is a very large, untapped market. They will download the ebook or print book and then do the incredibly laborious work of re-formatting it for its next reader —stripping junk HTML, OCR scanning, adding alt text, etc.